Archives

  • 2019-10
  • 2019-11
  • 2020-03
  • 2020-07
  • 2020-08
  • Hunt R Fallone C Veldhuyzan van

    2020-08-28

    Hunt, R., Fallone, C., Veldhuyzan van Zanten, S., Sherman, P., Smaill, F., Flook, N., et al., 2004. Canadian Helicobacter Study Group Consensus Conference: update on the management of Helicobacter pylori—an evidence-based evaluation of six topics re-levant to clinical outcomes in patients evaluated for H pylori infection. Can. J. Gastroenterol. 18 (9), 547–554.
    International Agency for Research on Cancer, 1997. Epstein-Barr Virus and Kaposi's Sarcoma Herpesvirus/Human Herpesvirus 8. World Health Organization. International Agency for Research on Cancer, 2007. IARC Monographs on the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans, Human Papillomavirus.
    International Agency for Research on Cancer, 2012. IARC Monographs on the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans, Biological Agents. Lyon, France.  Preventive Medicine 122 (2019) 109–117
    Mehanna, H., Beech, T., Nicholson, T., El-Hariry, I., McConkey, C., Paleri, V., et al., 2013. Prevalence of human papillomavirus in oropharyngeal and nonoropharyngeal head and neck cancer—systematic review and meta-analysis of trends by time and region. Head Neck 35 (5), 747–755.
    R: 2097381-85-4 language and environment for statistical computingR Foundation for Statistical Computing [Internet] Available from: https://www.R-project.org/.
    Remis, R., 2010. Modelling the Incidence of Prevalence of Hepatitis C Infection and Its Sequelae in Canada, 2007. Public Health Agency of Canada.
    Statistics Canada, 2010. Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS) Data User Guide:
    Statistics Canada Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS). Available from: http:// www23.statcan.gc.ca/imdb/p2SV.pl?Function=getSurvey&SDDS=5071.
    Contents lists available at ScienceDirect
    Cancer Epidemiology
    journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/canep
    Cancers in France in 2015 attributable to insufficient physical activity T
    Marina Touillauda,b, Melina Arnoldc, Laure Dossusd, Heinz Freislinge, Freddie Brayc, Irène Margaritisf, Valérie Deschampsg, Isabelle Soerjomataramc, a Léon Bérard Cancer Centre, 28 rue Laennec, 69008 Lyon, France b Cancer Research Centre of Lyon, UMR Inserm 1052 CNRS 5286 Centre Léon Bérard, 69008 Lyon, France c Section of Cancer Surveillance, International Agency for Research on Cancer, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, 69008 Lyon, France d Nutrition and Metabolism Section, Biomarkers Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, 69008 Lyon, France e Nutrition and Metabolism Section, Nutritional Methodology and Biostatistics Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, 69008 Lyon, France f Nutrition Risk Assessment Unit, French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health & Safety (ANSES), 14 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 94701 Maisons-Alfort Cedex, France g Agence Nationale de Santé Publique, Université Paris 13, Centre de Recherche en Epidémiologie et Statistiques, COMUE Sorbonne Paris Cité, 74 rue Marcel Cachin, 93017 Bobigny cedex, France
    Keywords:
    Physical activity
    Cancer
    Prevention
    Population attributable fraction 
    Introduction: Insufficient physical activity is a known risk factor for various co-morbidities, including cancer. Globally, its prevalence has increased markedly over the past decades. The aim of this study was to estimate the proportion and number of cancers that were attributable to insufficient physical activity in France in 2015.
    Methods: Population attributable fractions (PAFs) and numbers of cancer cases attributable to insufficient physical activity (< 30 min daily of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity) were estimated by age, sex and cancer site. Assuming a 10-year lag-period, PAFs were calculated using physical activity prevalence from a cross-sectional French population survey and cancer-specific relative risks.
    Results: About half of all French adults were found to be insufficiently physically active, with great variation by age and sex. In 2015, an estimated 2973 cancer cases diagnosed in French adults aged 30y+ were attributable to insufficient physical activity, corresponding to 0.8% of all cancer cases (0.2% in men and 1.6% in women). This comprised 3.8% of all postmenopausal breast cancers (1620 cases), 3.6% of all colon cancers (902 cases) and 6.0% of all cancers of the corpus uteri (450 cases). If at least half of the recommended physical activity level was achieved, 1095 cancer cases could have been avoided.
    Conclusion: Insufficient physical activity is associated to about 3000 cancer cases in France, a country with comparatively low but increasing prevalence of this risk factor. This result is important for setting priorities in cancer prevention programmes aiming to increase physical activity in France and Europe in general.